News and Trends, News and Trends

Hidden in the Hillside

Fernando Alda

After the Open Platform for Architecture's recent proposal to build a home into the side of a cliff in the style of brutalism, yet another nod to the 1950s architectural movement comes in the form of this unassuming painter's studio sunken into the bedrock in Chile overlooking the Pacific Ocean. According to DesignBoom, Architect Felipe Assadi designed this concrete creation as an addition to Cassa Bahia Azul, a minimalist home that seems to teeter on the rocks a few metres above waves.

Casa Bahia Azul teeters on the rocks with the Taller de Pintura sitting more solidly to the left. Casa Bahia Azul teeters on the rocks with the Taller de Pintura sitting more solidly to the left.

This design style is carried through to the studio which has literally been built into the hillside. The result is a structure that is almost hidden from view, making it seem a secret hideout. A roof garden and surrounding indigenous foliage serve to conceal the structure effectively too. Yet, while the little studio is concealed by the hillside, its architectural genius does not go unnoticed.
Floating stairs sink into the earth as they lead you into Taller de Pintura, the painter's studio. Floating stairs sink into the earth as they lead you into Taller de Pintura, the painter's studio.

Based just outside the coastal town of Los Vilos in Chile, both the main house and the studio have windows that stretch from one wall to the other, allowing natural light to flow freely, but where the main house has irregular rectangular windows cutting through the structure, offsetting what might otherwise be a formidable appearance, the studio offers a more traditional take on the brutalist tradition with its functional lines. For more, visit felipeassadi.com READ MORE: Concrete joins the earth Licence to thrill Vintage discovers new style