city, houses

Casa Horta is a designer's technicolour dream

José Hevia


casa horta

Casa Horta is located in the neighbourhood of Guinardo on the outskirts of Barcelona, Spain. Built in the early 20th century, the previously run-down building has been extensively renovated into an eccentric, three-storey home for young designer Guillermo Santomà.

The entire interior was gutted, leaving only the bones of the original house. At first sight, the 1920s single-family home looks devoid of any furniture but, upon closer inspection, almost every component is built in, from the seating to appliances. Shades of deep green, bubblegum pink and sky blue delineate the space and emphasise its geometric forms, while providing a gorgeously saturated and dramatic backdrop.

casa horta

'In place of an architectural plan,' Santomà told Apartamento, 'we had a team of five guys… [with] only very basic notions of construction.' Despite this, Casa Horta is full of life. Traditional Spanish tiles are updated with tightly packed '80s-era pink squares, the staircases are as decorative as they are functional and a faux skylight is just one of the home's many playful features.

Yet, the designer hasn't neglected to pay homage to the home's rich heritage by retaining a few of its more traditional elements, with many of the original ornate doors and feature tiles still intact. Guided by Santomà's visionary eye, the eclectic home is an immersive showcase of the tension between old and new. And if Casa Horta is anything to go by, this up-and-coming design talent is certainly one to keep an eye on in the future.

See more of Santomà's work at guillermosantoma.com.

casa horta

casa hortacasa horta

casa horta