decor, design

The Monochrome Chronicles: Andrea Kleinloog

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andrea kleinloog Andrea Kleinloog and Megan Hesse

Andrea Kleinloog and Megan Hesse of Anatomy Design have brought out their new Park Lane collection in collaboration with Corian. Having launched at Design Joburg 2017, the product line celebrates black – perfectly in line with the theme of House and Leisure's black-and-white July issue. In the first Q&A in our four-part Monochrome Chronicles series, we chat to Kleinloog about the all-black range and the role this intriguing pigment has in design.

You worked with Corian on this range. Can you tell us more about it?

In discussion with Corian, we aimed to break the mould of its usual aesthetic – the solid surface material is mainly white and used only in kitchen counters. It was immensely exciting to be able to work with thermoforming, engraving and bending the material into forms with a more timeless shapes that transcend the usual skinny, polished surface. We also created heavy forms that aren't commonly associated with such a high-tech material.

How does black emphasise design, and your designs in particular?

Black adds weight and depth to both a product and space. It can be a black hole that sucks all the colour into it, or it can be a wonderful platform to celebrate the other tones that it misses. It can also be used to ground elements such as window frames, or to create accents without committing to colour.

Look inside Andrea Kleinloog's stylish family home in Johannesburg.

andrea kleinloog Anatomy Design's Park Lane collection, launched at Design Joburg 2017

A black-and-white palette can often feel harsh. How do you soften it?

In general, we avoid strictly black and strictly white – there is a remarkable spectrum in the 'in-between'. There are dappled, woven textures, natural fibres and finishes, all of which have a 'colour', but also have colour amiss.

What are your go-to techniques when it comes to working without colour?

We tend to avoid primary colours and ironically, blending black into any colour gives it a deeper, more complex tone. A good example is the contrast of primary yellow and ochre, or sky blue and petrol blue.

andrea kleinloogAnatomy Design's Park Lane collection, launched at Design Joburg 2017

Have you ever considered exploring the opposite end of the spectrum and going all-out with bold colour in your work?

Absolutely – it depends on the client, and their needs.

Who are some of the artists working in black and white that you admire?

Willem Boshoff is known for his black-and-white typeface works, which are always challenging to read, and form various beautiful images. I also admire Neil le Roux and Richard Penn for their intricate fineliner or ballpoint pen drawings that are somehow solid yet completely transparent.

Visit anatomydesign.co.za for more details.

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andrea kleinloogAnatomy Design's Park Lane collection, launched at Design Joburg 2017
andrea kleinloogAnatomy Design's Park Lane collection, launched at Design Joburg 2017